Content Type and Core Message

As you will have discovered in the Customer Acquisition topic, each buyer has a specific set of objections at each stage of their customer journey.

You should use content as an opportunity to either help your buyers overcome their own objections, or educate them on benefits of your product or service. In both instances, your objective is to move the prospect to the next stage in their customer journey through the content that they are engaging with.

In the forthcoming topics, we will begin to focus on your touch points and how you can use touch points to your advantage - remembering that these are the various points and opportunities you have to understand your potential customer and provide valuable information to them.

You may find that many, most, or even all, of your touch points are offline.  This is fine.  This is why we want to introduce inbound marketing to your overall marketing strategy.

In the case of your touch points and interactions with your potential customers being offline, their objections at that stage are still relevant to your digital marketing campaign.  We can use these objections defined in our Customer Journey Maps to create content that addresses these objections.  

You can create a whole host of different content in the way of blogs, articles, eBooks, videos, comparisons, buyers guides, etc, and then use online tools and channels such; as social media, online advertising, websites, etc to get that content in front of our potential customers.     

The table below shows a list of content examples and how they can relate to each stage in your customer journey. It is advisable to have as much variety as possible in your content to keep it fresh and interesting to your audience. The content types listed below are not exhaustive, and the stages they are applied to are not exclusive, but do show a typical example of good use cases. 

Types of Content

 

Awareness

Research

Evaluate

Retain

Newsletters

     

x

Buyers Guides

   

x

 

How to Guides

x

     

List Based Content (Top 10s)

x

     

Best Practice Guides

 

x

   

Product Reviews

 

x

   

Best of Lists

x

     

Case Studies

 

x

   

Common Mistakes With…

x

     

Frequently Asked Questions

   

x

 

White Papers

 

x

   

Industry Reports

 

x

   

Webinars

   

x

 

Comparisons

   

x

 

Whiteboard Presentation

x

x

   

Before & After Examples

 

x

x

 

Product or Service Descriptions

x

x

   

Talking Slides

   

x

 

Animated Explainers

x

     

Talking FAQ’s

   

x

 

How to Guide

   

x

x

Screen Captures

 

x

   

Headshot / Interview styles

 

x

   

Core Message

In the Customer Journey section of the Customer Acquisition topic, we looked at identifying the points at which the buyer interacts with your brand (touch-points), and then identified the objections they have at that same stage.  

If you're not currently doing any online activities, this is the point where we begin to introduce your digital marketing process.

Our objective is to produce online content for each buyer persona which speaks to whatever objections they might have for buying from you.  We will then look to deliver that content to the prospect at those touch-points during that stage in their customer journey.

When creating content you should first define the core message for it.  The core message being, 'what you want the prospect to understand or take away from reading / engaging with that piece of content'.  

Each piece of content needs to carry a core message.  The core message is the main point of what you want the buyer to understand. It is the one thing that you want them to take-away after reading or viewing that piece of content.  It should be the thing that alleviates the buyer of their concern or objection at that stage.

When you are producing content for a core message, think of how many different ways that you can tell the same story.  This is because you can have multiple pieces of content that all deliver a single core message but from different angles. 

The objection the prospect may have could be around cost, the prospect may feel the blade is too expensive.  To alleviate this objection the shaving company wants to convey that the prospect is buying the best blade on the market.  They are buying quality, the best money can buy, and because of the quality, their blades last longer and so the overall cost is reduced.

For example, the core message," they have the best blades on the market", may produce the following articles of content; one based on users having less irritation because of the sharpness of the blade, one based on giving a closer shave because of the sharpness of the blade, and finally one based on how their blades last longer than their competitors.  

The core message always remains the same, that"they have the best blades on the market", but the content type to deliver this message changes.  They are essentially telling the same story but in three different ways.


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